50+ Facts About the Indian Constitution You Probably Never Heard Of

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The Indian Constitution is the supreme law of the Republic of India and one of the longest written constitutions in the world. Enacted on 26 January 1950, it lays down the framework for the governance of the country and defines the fundamental rights and duties of its citizens. Despite being a vital document that affects the lives of every Indian, there are many facts about the Indian Constitution that are not widely known. In this article, we will explore 51 of these lesser-known facts about the Indian Constitution and uncover some of the surprising and intriguing aspects of this important document.

Here are 51 fascinating facts about the Indian Constitution.

 

  1. The Indian Constitution is the longest written constitution in the world, with over 117,000 words and 448 articles due to 100 amendments. Originally it had 395 articles in 22 parts and eight schedules.
  2. The preamble of the Indian Constitution was inspired by the United States Constitution and the Irish Constitution.
  3. The Indian Constitution guarantees the right to free and compulsory education for children between the ages of 6 and 14.
  4. The Indian Constitution allows for the creation of “temporary, transitorily and special” laws, which are laws that apply only in certain circumstances and for a specific period of time.
  5. The Indian Constitution allows for the creation of “economic and social legislation,” which is legislation that is designed to promote the welfare and well-being of the people.
  6. The Indian Constitution allows the government to nationalize any industry or business if it is deemed to be in the national interest.
  7. The Indian Constitution allows for the creation of “protective discrimination,” which is affirmative action designed to help disadvantaged groups.
  8. The Indian Constitution guarantees the right to freedom of religion, but also allows for the state to regulate religious practices in the interests of public order, morality, and health.
  9. The Indian Constitution allows for the creation of “preventive detention,” which is the detention of individuals without trial if they are deemed to be a threat to national security.
  10. The Indian Constitution allows the government to censor the media in the interests of national security, public order, and decency.
  11. The Indian Constitution allows for the creation of “suitable arrangements” for the promotion of the “welfare of the Scheduled Tribes,” which are indigenous communities that have been historically disadvantaged.
  12. The Indian Constitution allows for the creation of “linguistic provinces,” which are states created on the basis of language.
  13. The Indian Constitution contains a provision for the “reservation of seats” in parliament and state legislatures for scheduled castes and scheduled tribes.
  14. The Indian Constitution guarantees the right to form unions. It also allows the government to impose restrictions on these rights in the interests of public order.
  15. The right to go on strike is not explicitly mentioned in the Indian Constitution. In the case of Kameshwar Prasad v. The State of Bihar (1958), the Supreme Court ruled that the right to strike is not a fundamental right.
  16. The Indian Constitution allows the president to declare a “financial emergency” in the event of a threat to the stability of the country’s financial system.
  17. The Indian Constitution provides for the establishment of a “Supreme Court” as the highest court of the land, as well as “high courts” at the state level and “district courts” at the lower levels.
  18. The Indian Constitution allows for the creation of “special courts” to deal with specific types of cases, such as cases involving election disputes or corruption.
  19. The Indian Constitution guarantees the right to a fair and speedy trial, and allows for the creation of “tribunals” to handle specialized legal cases.
  20. The Indian Constitution guarantees the right to privacy, but also allows for certain restrictions to be placed on this right in the interests of national security and public order.
  21. The Indian Constitution guarantees the right to freedom of speech and expression, but also allows for certain restrictions to be placed on this right in the interests of public order, defamation, and incitement to violence.
  22. The Indian Constitution provides for the appointment of a “Comptroller and Auditor General” to audit the accounts of the government and ensure financial accountability.
  23. The Indian Constitution allows the government to impose “reasonable restrictions” on the right to property in the interests of the general public.
  24. The Indian Constitution guarantees the right to work, leisure, and the opportunity to participate in the cultural life of the community, but also allows for certain restrictions to be placed on these rights in the interests of the general public.
  25. The Indian Constitution allows for the creation of “economic and social planning,” which is the development of policies and programs aimed at promoting economic and social development.
  26. The Indian Constitution allows the government to impose “reasonable restrictions” on the right to carry on a trade or business in the interests of the general public.
  27. The Indian Constitution guarantees the right to a clean and healthy environment, but also allows for certain restrictions to be placed on this right in the interests of the general public.
  28. The Indian Constitution allows for the creation of “reserved forests,” which are forests set aside for the preservation of forests and wildlife.
  29. The Indian Constitution provides for the establishment of a “Forest Conservation Committee” to oversee the protection and preservation of forests.
  30. The Indian Constitution guarantees the right to equal pay for equal work, but also allows for certain exceptions to be made in the interests of the general public.
  31. The Indian Constitution guarantees the right to freedom of movement and residence within the country, but also allows for certain restrictions to be placed on this right in the interests of the general public.
  32. The Indian Constitution provides for the establishment of a “Union Public Service Commission” to oversee the recruitment and selection of government officials.
  33. The Indian Constitution allows the government to impose “reasonable restrictions” on the right to hold public office in the interests of the general public.
  34. The Indian Constitution guarantees the right to a clean and transparent government, and provides for the establishment of a “Central Vigilance Commission” to investigate allegations of corruption.
  35. The Indian Constitution allows for the creation of “special officers” to promote the interests of disadvantaged groups, such as scheduled castes and scheduled tribes.
  36. The Indian Constitution guarantees the right to a clean and transparent government, and provides for the establishment of a “Central Information Commission” to oversee the implementation of the Right to Information Act.
  37. The Indian Constitution guarantees the right to a clean and transparent government, and provides for the establishment of a “Central Bureau of Investigation” to investigate serious crimes and corruption.
  38. The Indian Constitution allows the government to impose “reasonable restrictions” on the right to practice a profession or carry on a trade in the interests of the general public.
  39. The Indian Constitution guarantees the right to a clean and transparent government, and provides for the establishment of a “Lokpal” to investigate allegations of corruption against high-level government officials.
  40. The Indian Constitution allows the government to impose “reasonable restrictions” on the right to form or participate in political parties in the interests of the general public.
  41. The Indian Constitution provides for the establishment of a “Finance Commission” to make recommendations on the distribution of tax revenues between the national government and the states.
  42. The Indian Constitution guarantees the right to a clean and transparent government, and provides for the establishment of a “Central Bureau of Direct Taxes” to oversee the administration of direct taxes.
  43. The Indian Constitution guarantees the right to a clean and transparent government, and provides for the establishment of a “Central Bureau of Indirect Taxes and Customs” to oversee the administration of indirect taxes and customs duties.
  44. The Indian Constitution allows the government to impose “reasonable restrictions” on the right to acquire, hold, and dispose of foreign property in the interests of the general public.
  45. The Indian Constitution provides for the establishment of a “Central Economic Intelligence Bureau” to investigate economic crimes and money laundering.
  46. The Indian Constitution guarantees the right to a clean and transparent government, and provides for the establishment of a “Central Financial Intelligence Unit” to investigate financial crimes and terrorism financing.
  47. The Indian Constitution includes a provision for the appointment of a “Chief Election Commissioner” to oversee the conduct of elections and ensure their fairness and transparency.
  48. The Indian Constitution allows the government to impose “reasonable restrictions” on the right to own and possess firearms in the interests of public safety.
  49. The Indian Constitution guarantees the right to a clean and healthy environment, and provides for the establishment of a “Central Pollution Control Board” to monitor and regulate environmental pollution.
  50. The Indian Constitution allows the government to impose “reasonable restrictions” on the right to freely enter and exit the country in the interests of national security.
  51. The Indian Constitution guarantees the right to a clean and healthy environment, and provides for the establishment of a “National Green Tribunal” to hear and decide cases related to environmental protection.

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